Sunday, 19 January 2020

Writing day - "Anticipating the societal transformation required to solve the environmental crisis in the 21st century: Umwelt trajectories revisited"

Today I have had half an article writing day devoted to work on my article "Anticipating the societal transformation required to solve the environmental crisis in the 21st century: Umwelt trajectories revisited", with some 900 words added.

This brings number of article writing days this Spring up to 5.

Friday, 17 January 2020

"Introducing a notion of accummulated GDP" revised; submitted to Scandinavian Economic History Review

Today I have made some edits/minor revisions in my article "Introducing a notion of accummulated GDP", which I am submitting to Scandinavian Economic History Review. Some 300 words added.

Thursday, 16 January 2020

Article writing day with work done in relation to three articles

Today I have had a 6 hour, full article writing day, bringing total number of writing days this Spring up to 4,5. My work today was devoted to:
 - minor (formatting-focused) revision of my article "Current human ecology in the Amazon and beyond: A multi-scale ecosemiotic approach" (cf. post about conditional acceptance)
 - writing a bionote for The American Journal of Semiotics to accompany my accepted article (now in production) "What can be known about future Umwelten?"
- reading and taking notes for a minor revision of my article manuscript "Introducing a notion of accumulated GDP" (which I have decided to soon submit to a second journal)

Global/Amazon human ecology article revised once more; accepted

Today I was notified that the editorial decision on my revised version of "Current human ecology in the Amazon and beyond: A multi-scale ecosemiotic approach" is "Accept but incomplete - revise". I have already submitted a second revision.

Faculty leadership meeting

Today I have attended a faculty leadership meeting, where we prepared for our meeting with the pro-rector for research next week.

Abstract for ISQOLS 2020: Wasted and wasteful growth in the USA

Yesterday I finished and submitted the abstract below for the 18th Annual Conference of the International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (ISQOLS 2020), to be held in Rotterdam in August.

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Wasted and wasteful growth in the USA

If the purpose of economic growth is to improve human welfare, then assessments should be made as to whether or not growth in fact contributes to improved welfare. By investigating Gross Domestic Product (GDP)/Gross National Income (GNI), Human Development Index (HDI) and inequality data, this article evaluates to what extent economic growth in the United States of America (USA) has benefited its population since 1990, the year in which HDI was launched. Comparisons are made with the Nordic countries. These are about as rich as the USA, but known for an alternative model of development, the Nordic welfare model, which is known for being focused on equality and equal opportunities. A notion of wasted growth, defined as real GDP/GNI per capita growth not accompanied by improved non-income Human Development, is introduced. Furthermore, the phenomenon of wasteful growth, understood as GDP/GNI per capita growth that only results in marginal improvements in non-income Human development, is investigated. The investigation is performed by looking into the components of HDI, namely average income, life expectancy and number of school years, and by comparing nonincome HDI values with GDP/GNI per capita growth rates. I further calculate nonincome IHDI values, i.e. inequality-adjusted nonincome Human Development values, for the period covered, to look into what difference inequality makes in evaluations of wasted and wasteful growth. The rather mediocre HDI performance of the USA in recent years begs the question: Is US growth wasted on the rich?

Wednesday, 15 January 2020

Two meetings and performance appraisal

Today I have attended a planning meeting about the faculty´s Academic day (Fagdag), and a steering group meeting for the NORPART project CubaNor. I have also had my annual performance appraisal with the Dean of the faculty, Gro Ellen Mathisen.